Place:


Lickey  Worcestershire

 

In 1870-72, John Marius Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales described Lickey like this:

LICKEY, a chapelry in the parishes of Bromsgrove and Kings-Norton, Worcester; on the Birmingham and Gloucester railway, at the junction of the branch to Redditch, 4 miles NE of Bromsgrove. It was constituted in 1858; and it contains the r. station of BarntGreen, and has a post office under Bromsgrove. ...


Pop. in 1861,1 361. Houses, 285. Pop. of the Bromsgrove portion, 876. Houses, 182. The Lickey hills include Rubury, Bilberry, Rednall, and Beacon; they exhibit scenes of remarkable beauty; they command very extensive and very fine prospects; and one of them is crowned with an obelisk, in memory of the late Earl of Plymouth. A spring here sends off two runnels, one of which goes through the Stour to the Severn, while the other goes through the Rea and the Trent to the German ocean. Pleasure parties from a far extent of surrounding country, and from Birmingham, visit Lickey in the summer months; and visitors find good accommodation at a local hotel. The living is a p. curacy in the diocese of Worcester. Value, £200.* Patron, the Vicar of Bromsgrove. The church was built in 1856, at a cost of about £2,000; is in the early English style; and consists of nave, aisles, and chancel, with a belfry. There are chapels for Independents, Wesleyans, and Primitive Methodists, and a national school.

Lickey through time

Lickey is now part of Bromsgrove district. Click here for graphs and data of how Bromsgrove has changed over two centuries. For statistics about Lickey itself, go to Units and Statistics.

How to reference this page:

GB Historical GIS / University of Portsmouth, History of Lickey, in Bromsgrove and Worcestershire | Map and description, A Vision of Britain through Time.

URL: http://www.visionofbritain.org.uk/place/20978

Date accessed: 28th July 2021


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