Place:


Dovercourt  Essex

 

In 1870-72, John Marius Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales described Dovercourt like this:

DOVER-COURT, a parish in Tendring district, Essex; at the mouth of the estuary of the river Stour, and on the Harwich branch of the Eastern Union railway, 2 miles WSW of Harwich. It has a station on the railway, and two post offices, of the names of Lower Dover-Court and Upper Dover-Court, under Harwich. ...


Acres, 2, 966; of which 1, 220 are water. Real property, £6, 270. Pop., 1, 231. Houses, 232. The property is subdivided. Lower Dover-Court is a suburb to Harwich; and Upper Dover-Court includes fine terrace-lines of houses, a great number of villas and other fine residences, a first-class hotel, a spa and assembly-rooms, sea-walls and marine drives, all of recent construction, and is becoming a favourite watering resort. The land is noted for fine hard elm. The living is a vicarage, united with the p. curacy of Harwich-St. Nicholas, in the diocese of Rochester. Value, £221. Patron, the Lord Chancellor. The church is of brick; was built in 1821, at a cost of £20, 000; and occupies the site of a previous church, which dated from the 13th century, had a guild and a famous crucifix, and contained a tomb to Secretary Clarke, killed in 1666 in action against De Ruyter. The crucifix was reputed to be miraculous, and attracted many pilgrims; and three men were executed in 1532 for carrying it off and burning it. See Harwich.

Dovercourt through time

Dovercourt is now part of Tendring district. Click here for graphs and data of how Tendring has changed over two centuries. For statistics about Dovercourt itself, go to Units and Statistics.

How to reference this page:

GB Historical GIS / University of Portsmouth, History of Dovercourt, in Tendring and Essex | Map and description, A Vision of Britain through Time.

URL: http://www.visionofbritain.org.uk/place/6685

Date accessed: 23rd January 2020


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